Posted in TS2, TS3, TS4

Progression in Working Scientifically

In a recent science seminar we looked at how scientific skills can be developed through practical enquiries.

Enquiry skills include:

  • Raising Questions
  • Hypothesising
  •  Predicting
  • Using Observations
  • Planning and conducting investigations
  • Interpreting evidence and drawing conclusions
  • Communicating, reporting and reflecting

We can develop these enquiry skills by:

  • Providing children with opportunities to encounter materials and phenomena first hand.
  • Communication.
  • Providing challenging tasks whilst also providing scaffold support.
  • Teaching specific techniques needed for advancing skills.
  • Helping Children to record their ideas in ways that support systematic working and review.

Working scientifically includes:

  • Observing over time – Magic Flowers. Cut out a paper flower and fold the petals inwards. Place the flower in a tray of water and observe what happens. The paper absorbs the water up the petals causing the petals to drop and the flower to open.

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  • Pattern Seeking – Reaction Strips. Drop the strip and see how long it takes for your partner to catch the strip. See if the times get better or worse. Reaction times can be affected by many thing (e.g. tiredness, concentration etc.)

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  • Identifying, classifying and grouping – Animal Sort. Sort the animals in to groups. There are many ways in which animals can be sorted depending on your focus.

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  • Comparative and fair testing (controlled investigations) – Bubbles. Blowing bubbles. How do you make it a fair test? Same person would blow each time, at the same rate, same mixture of bubbles etc.

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  • Research using secondary sources.

 

It is important when teaching any science lesson that a working scientifically learning objective is included. This therefore allows the child to progress in both areas of science, developing their skills and knowledge.

 

Posted in TS2, TS3, TS4, TS6

Application of Mathematics – LOTC

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It is all well and good for children to learn the skills and theory taught in maths, however if they do not know how to apply it, how can they use it in the future?

It is important that we consider the needs of all children within our lessons. Children with ASD tend to have difficulty in applying skills learnt to real life contexts and therefore we must approach this issue and give them the opportunity to link theory with reality. One approach for this is by taking children out of the classroom.

The specific example above shows an approach for taking a class of year 5 children to an airport with a specific focus on the measurement strand within the primary maths curriculum, although there are many cross-curricular links available to other subjects.

From just one setting there are many possibilities that will engage and motivate but also assist children in their learning. This will not just benefit the children cognitively but also socially and emotionally, with many of them increasing their confidence when in public places. We are encouraging children to think and reflect, being conscientious about their work and others.

 

TARGET: To continue looking at different approaches of encouraging children to apply theory learnt with reality.