Posted in TS1, TS2, TS4, TS5, TS6

Differentiation in Maths

 

In my Phase 2 placement, the school took a differentiated approach to Maths. This meant that they planned their lesson daily, with the first lesson being a whole class input and the follow up lesson being planned for differentiated groups.

I really enjoyed this approach as it allowed all children to progress to the level which suited them. It gave children the opportunity to either revisit a particular area or to attempt the next steps at Greater Depth.

Although this meant that they was more preparation for the lesson, with many activities being planned, children progressed at significant amounts.

Above are examples of the differentiated activities. The main focus of the class was to try and get on to the next steps which was problem solving.

TARGET: Continue to explore differentiation techniques.

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Posted in TS1, TS2, TS6

Children Being Reflective

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During my Phase 2 placement, I was beginning to find that children were starting to lose motivation in their learning and I began to reflect on this situation. Having also discussed it with my class teacher, I decided that a likely cause for a lack of motivation was due to children not being reflective and seeing the progress that they had made.

I therefore created a traffic light system (seen in the photo above) which allowed children to decide and reflect on how they found the work that lesson and the progress that they had made. Once the lesson had finished, children would place their book in the tray which they thought best suited them.

I found that this got the children to reflect and think about their work more thoroughly. It began to make the children strive for greater depth within the lesson, as they wanted to be able to place their book in the green tray. Having used it over a series of lessons, it also allowed children to see the progress that they had made and was suitable for all children in the classroom. I was also able to use this to influence my own assessment.

TARGET: Continue to allow children the opportunities to reflect in lessons.

Posted in TS1, TS2

Setting goals and expectations

At the start of each lesson I always present to the children the ‘I can’ – this is what I expect the children to be able to do by the end of the lesson. This allows the children to clearly see the expectations and allows the children to be challenged during their learning.

I am also able to do this by setting further steps to learning, so that children have the opportunity to reach Greater Depth. This therefore allows all children the chance to be challenged at all ability levels.

 

TARGET: Continue to set goals that can stretch and challenge all children.

Posted in TS1, TS2, TS6

Giving Feedback

I regularly give feedback in all of my lessons, both verbally and written.

This was noted by my mentor in several lesson observations. I am always keen to give children verbal feedback, especially when questioning, as it motivates and encourages children to partake fully in their learning.

I have used the schools marking policy when giving written feedback. The school uses ‘stars and wishes’ when marking, to highlight the positives in their work and the areas on which I would like the child to try and improve in their work in the future. I also am able to reward the children for especially good work, by writing a number in a bubble, which symbolise the number of ‘good  marks’ awarded to the children.

 

TARGET: Continue to look at other methods of giving feedback to children.

Posted in TS1, TS2, TS6

Assessment – tracking progress

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Above is an example of a tracking grid that I created to monitor the progress of children through each lesson.

I update the tracking grid during and at the end of each lesson. I use both formative (observations, questioning, discussions) and summative (children’s work, assessments) assessment to fill in the grid.

This has allowed me to see the progression that children have made, as well as set targets and guide pupils to stretch and challenge them.

TARGET: Continue to develop knowledge of statutory assessment requirements.

Posted in TS2, TS3, TS4, TS5, TS6, TS8

Differentiated Planning

Having experienced different formats of planning, I have been able to see the different ways that teachers differentiate their planning.

On my current placement I have been introduced to the schools format of maths planning, in which teachers plan daily. The first lesson is a whole class input, with children completing the same activity. This is differentiated through teacher/TA support and resources, as well as implementing next steps for the children to attempt once completed. Through formative assessment and summative assessment of the children’s work that lesson, the teacher decides what to do in the next lesson. This may be moving on to a new area of the topic, or to revisit what the children have just done in the lesson.

When revisiting, children are grouped in to 3 different groups (working towards, expected greater depth – though children are not aware of this) and the input and activity is differentiated according to how these groups of children managed the previous lesson. Each group has their own teacher input at various times throughout the lesson and of various lengths of time depending on their needs. Whilst a group is having the teacher input, the other two groups work on an activity that reinforces or further develops that learnt previously. A TA works with these two groups to support them.

I have found that this planning approach is extremely beneficial, as teaching is adapted appropriately so progression is ensured for all children. It is extremely important to be aware of the children’s prior knowledge and to build on this, but also to guide and allow the children to reflect on the progress that they make throughout. However this approach will only be fully successful with a TA, so that the children maintain their focus and have someone to go to without interrupting the teacher input and other children’s learning.

 

TARGET: To continue to explore differentiated teaching methods.

Posted in TS2, TS4, TS5

Modelling

The area that I found most difficult during Phase 1b placement was modelling. Having not much experience in a Year 1 classroom, I was unaware of the need to model when setting tasks for the children to complete.

Even though I was giving good explanations of what the children had to do, I was finding that their completed work was not what I expected. Following a discussion with the class teacher, it was highlighted to me the great importance of modelling. From then on, I ensured that I used this technique.

One of the best ways of modelling was printing out an enlarged version of the work that the children had to complete. I would then begin to complete it on the board, asking the children lot’s of question to ensure understanding and knowledge. I found that this was a very effective approach, with children completing the work to the standards set. I was able to use modelling within many of the lessons taught, including English, during which I would model what was expected using guided writes and class writes.

 

TARGET: Continue to use modelling when needed.