Posted in TS2, TS4, TS5

Modelling

The area that I found most difficult during Phase 1b placement was modelling. Having not much experience in a Year 1 classroom, I was unaware of the need to model when setting tasks for the children to complete.

Even though I was giving good explanations of what the children had to do, I was finding that their completed work was not what I expected. Following a discussion with the class teacher, it was highlighted to me the great importance of modelling. From then on, I ensured that I used this technique.

One of the best ways of modelling was printing out an enlarged version of the work that the children had to complete. I would then begin to complete it on the board, asking the children lot’s of question to ensure understanding and knowledge. I found that this was a very effective approach, with children completing the work to the standards set. I was able to use modelling within many of the lessons taught, including English, during which I would model what was expected using guided writes and class writes.

 

TARGET: Continue to use modelling when needed.

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Posted in TS2, TS3, TS4, TS7

Planting Beans

I am a strong believer in hands on and practical science. I have seen for myself how it can engage and motivate children to investigate further and ask questions which help to develop their understanding.

 

In the final few weeks of the summer term, children planted beans as part of their science topic ‘Plants’. Children planted these themselves, cared for them and kept a diary, recording their observations of the bean as it grew over the weeks. I found that this was a great way for children to take responsibility for their work and you could see that the children had a sense of pride when their bean began to grow.

 

Even after the summer holidays I have received an update onthe beans (they could challenge Jack and the Beanstalk!!), showing a positive impact on the children’s attitudes towards learning and their development of understanding.

 

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TARGET: To continue to include physical and hands on experiences and experiments with in science topics.

Posted in TS1, TS2, TS3, TS4, TS8

Topic – The Great Fire of London

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During my Phase 1b placement I produced and delivered the topic lessons that were based on The Great Fire of London. Although there were not many lessons available to spend on the topic, I believed that it was right to give the children the opportunity to explore, discover and ask many questions.

 

In the first lesson, I introduced children to 1600’s London by showing a picture of current day London and a drawing of 1600’s London. Children were then given the opportunity to explore the pictures, discussing the similarities and differences they could see. Children fed their ideas in to a class discussion which prompted further questions to be asked and allowed children to think critically and develop their own understanding and perspectives.

 

In the next lessons that followed children engaged with creating a timeline of The Great Fire of London, focusing on key events and times. They developed their understanding of how we know about events that have happened in the past and used a variety of historical terms.

 

I was also able to spare time for the children to create their own Great Fire of London landscape. Children painted the background and buildings and added coloured squares of paper for the windows and doors of the buildings. Although the format was given to the children, the children’s creations were all different and presented their own ideas and understanding of the Great Fire of London. Children were able to develop their skills and techniques, creating effective and colourful pieces of work for the class display.

 

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If I was to do this topic again, I would allow for the children to partake in more independent investigative work.

 

TARGET: Use activities that will allow children to investigate further about the topic.

Posted in TS2, TS3, TS4

Progression in Working Scientifically

In a recent science seminar we looked at how scientific skills can be developed through practical enquiries.

Enquiry skills include:

  • Raising Questions
  • Hypothesising
  •  Predicting
  • Using Observations
  • Planning and conducting investigations
  • Interpreting evidence and drawing conclusions
  • Communicating, reporting and reflecting

We can develop these enquiry skills by:

  • Providing children with opportunities to encounter materials and phenomena first hand.
  • Communication.
  • Providing challenging tasks whilst also providing scaffold support.
  • Teaching specific techniques needed for advancing skills.
  • Helping Children to record their ideas in ways that support systematic working and review.

Working scientifically includes:

  • Observing over time – Magic Flowers. Cut out a paper flower and fold the petals inwards. Place the flower in a tray of water and observe what happens. The paper absorbs the water up the petals causing the petals to drop and the flower to open.

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  • Pattern Seeking – Reaction Strips. Drop the strip and see how long it takes for your partner to catch the strip. See if the times get better or worse. Reaction times can be affected by many thing (e.g. tiredness, concentration etc.)

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  • Identifying, classifying and grouping – Animal Sort. Sort the animals in to groups. There are many ways in which animals can be sorted depending on your focus.

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  • Comparative and fair testing (controlled investigations) – Bubbles. Blowing bubbles. How do you make it a fair test? Same person would blow each time, at the same rate, same mixture of bubbles etc.

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  • Research using secondary sources.

 

It is important when teaching any science lesson that a working scientifically learning objective is included. This therefore allows the child to progress in both areas of science, developing their skills and knowledge.

 

Posted in TS1, TS3, TS4, TS5, TS7, TS8

Mud Glorious Mud – Westmorland County Show

As a reward for their good behaviour and progress in their work, Class 2 at Morland Area C of E Primary School were taken for a day out tothe Westmorland County Show.

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This may not have been a particularly appropriate reward for some children, however with the school being in a rural setting and many of the children from farming families, this was an ideal treat for the children – and an educational one too!

Th children visited the education tent, looked at the stalls and watched a very entertaining display by The Sheep Show (http://www.thesheepshow.co.uk/) learning about the process of wool. They also had the opportunity to get close to the animals learning about British Agriculture and the process of how the food that the children eat, reaches their plate; something that is not widely taught in schools.

For me, I benefitted from this experience as I was able to learn about the process of organising a school visit. The class teacher involved me throughout the whole process, increasing my confidence and encouraging meto arrange class visits in the future. The key aim throughout the organisation, and the visit itself, was keeping the children and adults safe throughout their experience.

Everyone (including myself) had a highly enjoyable day even with such atrocious weather and being covered in mud from head to toe!

TARGET: Arrange a class visit.

Posted in TS2, TS3, TS4, TS6

Application of Mathematics – LOTC

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It is all well and good for children to learn the skills and theory taught in maths, however if they do not know how to apply it, how can they use it in the future?

It is important that we consider the needs of all children within our lessons. Children with ASD tend to have difficulty in applying skills learnt to real life contexts and therefore we must approach this issue and give them the opportunity to link theory with reality. One approach for this is by taking children out of the classroom.

The specific example above shows an approach for taking a class of year 5 children to an airport with a specific focus on the measurement strand within the primary maths curriculum, although there are many cross-curricular links available to other subjects.

From just one setting there are many possibilities that will engage and motivate but also assist children in their learning. This will not just benefit the children cognitively but also socially and emotionally, with many of them increasing their confidence when in public places. We are encouraging children to think and reflect, being conscientious about their work and others.

 

TARGET: To continue looking at different approaches of encouraging children to apply theory learnt with reality.